Why Your Business Needs To Become A Content Company?

Whilst success tends to be subjective, I’ve long believed that the businesses which excel tend to be those with the most compelling story. In many cases, it is this same story which binds a business to its audience that sets them apart from their competition. It is this essence of ‘brand‘ which keeps customers returning and defines successful content.

Depending on how long you have been in business, the means by which you convey your story may have changed. Where once the Yellow Pages was the go-to destination for reaching your audience; social media and search have all but transformed how content is found.

Whilst TV remains a primary channel, the prescriptive schedules of the traditional broadcasters have been disrupted by both a technological and a social layer. The technology is always-on and constantly connected whilst the social layer attempts to infuse a sense of community into the connected experience.

Collectively, over-the-top platforms (OTT) such as the Chromecast, Amazon Firestick or the AppleTV run many of the channels we find on our mobile devices i.e, Facebook, YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime etc. This means that the sit-back experience of the living room has become an organic extension of our mobile lives and vice-versa.

This represents a tremendous opportunity for today’s businesses. The power has been democratised, we can reach our target audience wherever we choose but first we have to accept that to do so, we must meet the prospect on their terms,  be it on either social media or out there in the wilderness of the open web. For more on what social channels befit your business, check out our blog ‘Choosing The Best Social Channels for your B2B Video

The customer is empowered to opt-in to your brand – or not as the case may be. This is why we must be producing content with a deeper understanding of personalisation, relevance and intimacy. Maybe a good place to start is to ask ourselves, ‘how well do we know our customer?’

So, why is Social, the Open Web and OTT so important? Because the customer is ageing. It should come as no surprise that millennials have arrived in positions of influence within the enterprise and millennials inhabit the social layer like no other demographic in society. Successful content today will entice its audience to participate in its reach.

If you look at how millennials engage with social media, it can be incredibly intimidating. There are multiple channels, speaking to different audiences with those users often rifling through their feeds at a pace which could be best compared to a treadmill for thumbs. Each moment is transitory and absolutely nothing feels permanent.

Daniel Ek – Spotify CEO

Spotify owner Daniel Ek, recently proclaimed in a letter to investors that Spotify wasn’t in the music business, it is in the moments business. I get his logic but by that definition, we’re presumably all in the ‘moments’ business.

The question remains, how do we enrich that moment so that our audience cares enough to be truly engaged. Successful content has to be powerful because online interactions need to stick almost immediately or risk not sticking at all.

As it happens the channels have been giving us a clear indication of the direction of travel for some time and it’s fairly widely accepted now that video is the most effective medium for capturing and retaining attention in social. Even LinkedIn has finally caught on, adding video to both personal profiles as well as company pages.

As business owners, it is our job to shape these conversations. To do that we have to be the creators of content which adds value and capitalises on the zeitgeist. Successful content is relevant, not spam. Not only that but we also have to do it with a certain level of scale because at the top of the funnel, our audience is only tapping into us for moments at a time.

We need lots of moments with our prospect for them to begin to notice us, even more for them to get a sense of our offering. More still to turn them into fans. Is it any wonder that we’ve witnessed a content explosion over the last few years. Further down the funnel, the moments we share tend to be longer because the engaged prospect will want more from us. 

If you haven’t done so already, step back and ask yourself ‘What is the story of your business? Why should your prospect care?’ The successful businesses of tomorrow won’t just have a fantastic story but they will weave their audience into the narrative and make them feel part of it because after all, what is a brand without loyalty?

About the Author

Nathan Haines

Nathan is the managing director of Element 26 and an expert in video production and video marketing. Nathan enjoys supporting companies to grow their businesses using video. Get in touch on Twitter @element26uk

Join Us For An Exclusive Breakfast: Mastering Video in The Enterprise

On Thursday 19th April, I’ll be speaking at a breakfast event at the Soho Hotel titled  “Enterprise Video: Best Practice”. Element 26 is one of four companies taking part, the others being PGi, Hive Streaming, and 27partners and you can find out more about each of these companies below. The event is free and we would love you to join us. You can register for the event here.

What does it take to run a successful video project in the enterprise?

It starts with the production of a great video and that’s where Element 26 comes in. As a video production company, we tend to be the first port of call when a business decides it wants a video.

That’s good news for us but it is by no means the whole story. There is no point us working hard with the client to create a fantastic video unless people are able to watch it. Our creativity is vital in helping enterprise clients tell their story – and this is what I will be talking about at the seminar – but so too is the practicality offered by our co-hosts.

As much as I firmly believe that content is king, the successful delivery of your video is queen and cannot be ignored.

Corporate clients often don’t want to hear or don’t believe that their networks can’t support the new video they have just completed. They assume that because they are a large or multi-national corporation their networks can handle it. Often this isn’t the case.

The event’s host, 27partners ensures that an organisation has the right infrastructure in place to make video effective for their business. You might be thinking: “Why do they need to worry about infrastructure, it’s all in the cloud, right?”

Often, this isn’t adequate because enterprise clients are required to keep their media in locations under their own control. They can’t use video platforms such as Brightcove, Wistia, etc. A practical example of how 27partners might help is by enabling a field salesperson with poor access to cellular reception to access the content they need to do their job.

In more every day uses, 27partners will go into an organisation and evaluate the technology they have invested in over the years to see if it is up to snuff for their future growth plans.

Hive Streaming has a different proposition. It is a software-only video streaming solution for organisations. Companies are increasingly embracing video communications with the result that often their networks are unable to cope with the demands placed on them. Hive’s clever software uses excess network capacity that enterprises already own to deliver high quality live and on demand video to users in an organisation.

PGi is the world’s largest dedicated provider of collaboration software and services. Its products include web, video and audio conferencing. In the past five years it has hosted 1.2 billion people from 155 countries in nearly 300 million virtual meetings.

I am really looking forward to the seminar and learning more about what these experts have to offer. We all work together to help enterprise clients get the most out of their video and I expect the event to be invaluable for any companies that use video.

As well as content creation, topics covered will include storage and management, distribution and delivery, presentation and access, reporting and analytics, plus how to evolve your video projects.

The speakers will be:

Nathan Haines (www.elementtwentysix.com)

Greg Holt and Owen Shackman: 27 partners (www.27partners.com)

Mark Coomber: Hive (www.hivestreaming.com)

Stephane Barnatt: Pgi (www.pgi.com)

Enterprise Video: Best Practice is taking place at The Soho Hotel, 4 Richmond Mews, London, W1D 3DH on Thursday 19th March from 8.30 am to 10.30 am. The event is free – please join us by registering here.

About the Author

Nathan Haines

Nathan is the managing director of Element 26 and an expert in video production and video marketing. Nathan enjoys supporting companies to grow their businesses using video. Get in touch on Twitter @element26uk